Cinnamon Rolls Recipe

Heather says:

It’s probably been at least five years since I’ve had Cinnabon cinnamon rolls. I’m drooling just thinking about it, but there aren’t any in our area and I never seem to remember while I’m traveling. These cinnamon rolls come pretty stinkin’ close. If you want to match their decadence you’ll have to increase the sugar mixture and roll the dough out wider and thinner. That’s the only difference. My favorite part of a cinnamon roll is the inside dough that is moist and gooey with cinnamon and sugar. If that’s the part you’re after, it’s manageable, but will take a just little more effort.

These are frugal, if you consider the cost of going out for fabulous cinnamon rolls. I’m sure someone can find cheap grocery-bakery alternatives, but I promise those are nothing like tearing into these straight from the oven.

I'm sure someone can find cheap grocery-bakery alternatives, but I promise those are nothing like tearing into these cinnamon rolls straight from the oven.

 

 

These can be made up to the proofing point and refrigerated overnight or they can be frozen in the pan. I would not double this dough, it’s somewhat obnoxious to work with, as it’s very soft. I would use a bread machine to make one batch, while I made a second to freeze for another occasion. If I had a functional bread machine, that is.

I’m not into putzy recipes. There are three mini-recipes within the big one, but only the dough seems complicated.  It’s probably a good thing I’m not patient enough to ever be a pastry chef, but these cinnamon rolls are good enough to be worth the effort.  I promise, this is high praise indeed from the likes of me.

Cinnamon Roll Dough Recipe

[There’s a printable recipe at the bottom of this post.]

  • 1 cup warm* milk
  • 1 packet or 2 1/4 tsps of active or instant dry yeast
  • 5 1/3 TBSP or 1/3 cup butter – melted
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 4 – 5 cups** of all purpose or plain flour (this is highly dependent on humidity)

*It’s very important that milk be warm, not hot. It shouldn’t be over 110F or you risk killing the yeast
** It was exceptionally humid the morning I tested this recipe and I needed nearly all 5 cups of flour. I would guess that the standard would be much closer to 4 cups.

To get started, stir the yeast into the milk and set aside for a moment.  While the yeast gets started, beat the eggs, melt the butter, measure the flour, sugar and salt.  In a mixing bowl combine the yeast & milk mixture, the beaten eggs, melted butter, sugar and salt. Stir until the sugar has dissolved. If you have a stand mixer, life just got easy. Add half the flour mixture and mix on medium low until combined. If you’re stirring by hand, same thing, but your arm might get tired. Begin adding the second half of the flour by half cupfuls until you reach the 4 cup point. Continue mixing the dough during this process.

If you are using a stand mixer, switch to the dough hook and knead for 2-3 minutes on low. Add the last cup of flour by scant 1/4 cups, only if necessary. If you are mixing by hand, turn the dough out onto a heavily flour dusted work surface and knead for 5 – 10 minutes, adding the extra flour only if necessary. This dough is very soft and we don’t want to create too much gluten, but it is important that it have enough structure to not fall apart when rolled into the spiral.

Spray or oil a large bowl and place the dough inside to rise. Set the dough in a warm, moist area, cover and let rise until nearly double in size. This will take an hour to an hour and a half.

Make the filling while you wait and butter a 9×13 pan.

Cinnamon Filling Recipe:

  • 1 packed cup of brown sugar
  • 1 TBSP ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 TBSP melted butter

Whisk together the first three ingredients. *whew* that was rough.

When the dough has finished rising, turn it out onto your work surface. Again, this needs to be heavily dusted with flour. Gently shape and roll into a 9 x15 rectangle. If you are trying to replicate Cinnabon cinnamon rolls, here’s where the variation happens. The dough rectangle should be at least 12 x 15, try for 15 x 15. It’s going to be a little awkward to work with, but think of the results.  Don’t double the filling recipe, increase it by half.

Brush with butterBrush the dough with butter.

cinnamon sugarThen sprinkle and spread the sugar mixture evenly over the dough.

Begin rollingVery carefully, begin rolling the dough into a spiral. Start at the edge closest to you and roll toward the far edge. Try to keep the roll as even as possible, but do NOT roll it tightly. If you roll it tightly the middles are going to pop out while they rise and bake and we’ll have to point and laugh at your funny rolls. I don’t like being mean, so don’t roll it tightly. Now that we’re straight, finish rolling your spiral.

Pinched SeamWhen you get to the far side, pinch the seam closed.

Rolled DoughNow turn the log of dough so the seam is now on the bottom. This helps squish it together so the rolls aren’t unspiraling as you transfer them to the baking dish.

Now, grab a serrated knife, a paper towel, a buttered 9×13 pan (glass or metal) and all the patience you can muster and cut the log into 12 rolls, just over an inch in thickness each. Cut using a gentle sawing motion. Transfer the roll after each cut, the dough is so soft that it will try to fall apart if you wait to move them at once. Wipe the knife blade with your paper towel after each cut. Like magic, you’ll have just enough room in the pan for the 12 rolls.

Now, it’s either time for proofing, refrigerating or freezing. Your choice. If placing the refrigerator overnight, cover the pan with plastic wrap. If freezing, cover with foil, if proofing turn your oven on to its lowest setting (110ish) for 3 minutes.  If you freeze the dough, let it thaw in the refrigerator overnight before baking. Whether frozen or refrigerated begin with the proofing step after the dough has rested in the fridge overnight.

proofingTo proof, fill a shallow pan with hot or boiling water and place on the lower rack of the oven.  Place the pan of rolls on the upper rack and close the door. DO NOT forget to turn the oven off if you let it heat for 3 minutes. We’re not cooking the rolls just yet, they are rising in a very humid and warm environment. Allow to proof for 30 minutes.

Remove the rolls and pan of water from the oven and preheat it to 350F. When the oven has reached temperature return the rolls to the rack, which should be in the middle position and bake for 30 minutes. The rolls should be light brown.a quick round up of all the cookie, biscotti, and other treat recipes here on Home-Ec 101.

While the rolls are baking, make the icing. Everyone has an opinion about the icing to roll ratio. I’ll leave that up to you, but I’d assume you’ll probably want to double my version as I don’t have a big sweet tooth.

Cinnamon Roll Icing Recipe

  • 1/4 cup cream cheese – softened
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tiny squirt or squeeze of lemon juice
  • 1 – 2 TBSPs milk

Combine all of the ingredients with an electric mixer until smooth. Spread the cream cheese frosting over the cinnamon rolls as soon as they are removed from the oven.

Rolls with frosting

Enjoy.

Cinnamon Rolls
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Ingredients
  1. Dough Ingredients

  2. 1 packet or 2 1/4 tsps of active or instant dry yeast
  3. 5 1/3 TBSP or 1/3 cup butter - melted
  4. 3 eggs
  5. 1/4 cup sugar
  6. 1 tsp salt
  7. 4 - 5 cups** of all purpose or plain flour (this is highly dependent on humidity)
  8. Filling Ingredients

  9. 1 packed cup of brown sugar
  10. 1 TBSP ground cinnamon
  11. 1 tsp salt
  12. 1 1/2 TBSP melted butter
  13. Icing Ingredients

  14. 1/4 cup cream cheese - softened
  15. 1 cup powdered sugar
  16. 1 tsp vanilla extract
  17. 1 tiny squirt or squeeze of lemon juice
  18. 1 - 2 TBSPs milk
Instructions
  1. Dough Instructions

  2. To get started, stir the yeast into the milk and set aside for a moment.  While the yeast gets started, beat the eggs, melt the butter, measure the flour, sugar and salt.  In a mixing bowl combine the yeast & milk mixture, the beaten eggs, melted butter, sugar and salt. Stir until the sugar has dissolved. If you have a stand mixer, life just got easy. Add half the flour mixture and mix on medium low until combined. If you're stirring by hand, same thing, but your arm might get tired. Begin adding the second half of the flour by half cupfuls until you reach the 4 cup point. Continue mixing the dough during this process.
  3. If you are using a stand mixer, switch to the dough hook and knead for 2-3 minutes on low. Add the last cup of flour by scant 1/4 cups, only if necessary. If you are mixing by hand, turn the dough out onto a heavily flour dusted work surface and knead for 5 - 10 minutes, adding the extra flour only if necessary. This dough is very soft and we don't want to create too much gluten, but it is important that it have enough structure to not fall apart when rolled into the spiral.
  4. Spray or oil a large bowl and place the dough inside to rise. Set the dough in a warm, moist area, cover and let rise until nearly double in size. This will take an hour to an hour and a half.
  5. Make the filling while you wait and butter a 9x13 pan.
  6. Cinnamon Filling Ingredients

  7. Whisk together the first three ingredients. *whew* that was rough.
  8. When the dough has finished rising, turn it out onto your work surface. Again, this needs to be heavily dusted with flour. Gently shape and roll into a 9 x15 rectangle. If you are trying to replicate Cinnabon cinnamon rolls, here's where the variation happens. The dough rectangle should be at least 12 x 15, try for 15 x 15. It's going to be a little awkward to work with, but think of the results.  Don't double the filling recipe, increase it by half.
  9. Brush the dough with butter.
  10. Sprinkle and spread the sugar mixture evenly over the dough.
  11. Very carefully, begin rolling the dough into a spiral. Start at the edge closest to you and roll toward the far edge. Try to keep the roll as even as possible, but do NOT roll it tightly. If you roll it tightly the middles are going to pop out while they rise and bake and we'll have to point and laugh at your funny rolls. I don't like being mean, so don't roll it tightly. Now that we're straight, finish rolling your spiral.
  12. When you get to the far side, pinch the seam closed.
  13. Turn the log of dough so the seam is now on the bottom. This helps squish it together so the rolls aren't unspiraling as you transfer them to the baking dish.
  14. Now, grab a serrated knife, a paper towel, a buttered 9x13 pan (glass or metal) and all the patience you can muster and cut the log into 12 rolls, just over an inch in thickness each. Cut using a gentle sawing motion. Transfer the roll after each cut, the dough is so soft that it will try to fall apart if you wait to move them at once. Wipe the knife blade with your paper towel after each cut. Like magic, you'll have just enough room in the pan for the 12 rolls.
  15. Now, it's either time for proofing, refrigerating or freezing. Your choice. If placing the refrigerator overnight, cover the pan with plastic wrap. If freezing, cover with foil, if proofing turn your oven on to its lowest setting (110ish) for 3 minutes.  If you freeze the dough, let it thaw in the refrigerator overnight before baking. Whether frozen or refrigerated begin with the proofing step after the dough has rested in the fridge overnight.
  16. To proof, fill a shallow pan with hot or boiling water and place on the lower rack of the oven.  Place the pan of rolls on the upper rack and close the door. DO NOT forget to turn the oven off if you let it heat for 3 minutes. We're not cooking the rolls just yet, they are rising in a very humid and warm environment. Allow to proof for 30 minutes.
  17. Remove the rolls and pan of water from the oven and preheat it to 350F. When the oven has reached temperature return the rolls to the rack, which should be in the middle position and bake for 30 minutes. The rolls should be light brown.
  18. While the rolls are baking, make the icing. Everyone has an opinion about the icing to roll ratio. I'll leave that up to you, but I'd assume you'll probably want to double my version as I don't have a big sweet tooth.
  19. Icing Instructions

  20. Combine all of the ingredients with an electric mixer until smooth. Spread the cream cheese frosting over the cinnamon rolls as soon as they are removed from the oven.
  21. Enjoy!
Notes
  1. *It's very important that milk be warm, not hot. It shouldn't be over 110F or you risk killing the yeast
  2. ** It was exceptionally humid the morning I tested this recipe and I needed nearly all 5 cups of flour. I would guess that the standard would be much closer to 4 cups.
Adapted from copycat Cinnabon
Adapted from copycat Cinnabon
Home Ec 101 http://www.home-ec101.com/




25 Comments

  1. Allegra on April 13, 2012 at 10:23 am

    These were amazing!! They were so fluffy and the filling was gooey and good. I left them in the refrigerator overnight and left out the proffing step and they still turned out fine. I loved how the sugar carmalized on the bottom of the roll. 

  2. Daddy_Life on July 10, 2011 at 4:19 pm

    Many Many years ago I worked in a cinnamon roll shop in the mall in Cheyenne Wyoming. I was too young and distracted by my female customers to ever think of making note of the recipe. You have inspired me to give it another try.

  3. Daddy_Life on July 10, 2011 at 4:19 pm

    Many Many years ago I worked in a cinnamon roll shop in the mall in Cheyenne Wyoming. I was too young and distracted by my female customers to ever think of making note of the recipe. You have inspired me to give it another try.

  4. Mike Paley on June 3, 2011 at 9:34 pm

    I've made this recipe three times over the last couple of months and they've come out great each time (including the first time when I neglected to proof them). Awesome recipe with awesome directions! Thanks so much!

  5. ThatBobbieGirl on February 4, 2011 at 11:27 pm

    Hey, these are great even without the frosting — which I found out today after I determined I had no cream cheese and no powdered sugar. I used my bread machine to do the hard work – the rest was easy as pie. Actually, MUCH EASIER than pie.
    My recent post Cuddly Vampires

  6. matalie on December 27, 2010 at 3:27 pm

    These were pretty good as a lighter option than what I've done in the past. Its been a tradition for us to make them for christmas morning. We eat pretty healthy most of the year and like to indulge in some of these things occasionally, but hate it when we feel ill afterwards! These were the Ticket! I played around with the dough proofing using bread flour and got a light and chewy dough with 1/4C of butter and an extra egg yolk proofed for 2.5 hours. THANKS!
    My recent post the official 2010 Matalie Gift Guide

  7. Elizabeth on December 25, 2010 at 12:39 pm

    thanks so much – this recipe was fantastic! Made them for my husband's birthday breakfast – they were a huge hit! Really appreciate your very detailed instructions and warnings, really helped. They turned out just perfect after refridgerating them overnight, then proofing and baking them the morning of his b-day. Thanks!!

  8. Aiming4Simple on September 19, 2009 at 4:25 am

    I prefer Grandy's Sinnamon rolls to Cinnabon, but they are not to be had around here. Inspired by your recipe, we might have to make our own tomorrow! They look incredibly good and will smell even better. My bread machine paddle has gone missing, so I will be following in my grandma's footsteps and kneading by hand.

  9. @JaxCC on September 12, 2009 at 12:54 pm

    :::drool::: These look incredible, Heather.

  10. Malia on September 11, 2009 at 1:48 pm

    Oh my word! Trying not to drool on the keyboard! Those look scrumptious 🙂 Thinking I'll pick up the necessary ingredients today and have those for breakfast Saturday morning.

  11. ThatBobbieGirl on September 11, 2009 at 12:55 pm

    So, if you did have a functioning bread machine, would you just dump in all the stuff and do the dough cycle? Coz I do have a functioning bread machine. In fact, I have two. No I'm not taunting you.

    • Heather Solos on September 11, 2009 at 1:10 pm

      That's exactly what I would do, if I had a functional bread machine. *le sniff* Just pick up the directions at the point where it's rolled out into a rectangle.

  12. Sonja on September 11, 2009 at 12:42 pm

    I made these last night. They are delicious! I've been looking for the perfect cinnamon roll recipe for years and I think these are it. I also want to try it with orange juice in the icing instad of lemon for Christmas morning. Thanks!!

  13. Lowcountry Bloggers » My Turn for the Round… :D » Blog Archive on September 10, 2009 at 9:15 pm

    […] those of you that love Cinnamon buns, our very own fave homemaker – made some today and they looks […]

  14. Chery Smithem on September 11, 2009 at 1:07 am

    Drool is making this hard to type. Loved your explicit directions and photos. Would love these this weekend.

  15. It Feels Like Chaos on September 11, 2009 at 1:04 am

    Thanks for your comment on my healthier family post last Friday. I am thankful it lead me to your blog because you have some great recipes! Can't wait to really look around and to try making my own egg rolls!

  16. azxure on September 11, 2009 at 12:31 am

    1. I know what I am making tomorrow!
    2. you can also turn the log 1/4 of a turn after each cut, but the tooth floss works better.

  17. kathleen on September 10, 2009 at 11:33 pm

    I think I just fell into a diabetic coma. I can imagine making these for weekend guests would make my place a more popular destination.

    Gorgeous pictures!

  18. CarolinaDreamz on September 10, 2009 at 9:10 pm

    Can I come live in your kitchen? 🙂

  19. ToyLady on September 10, 2009 at 4:02 pm

    I remember way back when, my son and I surprised my grandmother for her 75th birthday (it was 2 weeks before his first birthday – that's how long ago it was – he's 21 now!), and, never one to be caught off-guard, Grandma pulled her unbaked cinnamon rolls from the freezer, put them in the oven, and before we knew it, we were having "coffee" – well, the adults were, my son was chasing the dachshund around!

    I feel the urge to make a batch of cinnamon rolls. Thanks, Heather!

  20. julie on September 10, 2009 at 3:21 pm

    oooooh those look tooo good-been wanting to try home made cinnamon rolls—might have to dust off my bread machine……LOL

    julie
    meridian,ms

  21. Stephanie Johnson on September 10, 2009 at 1:38 pm

    if you pop the log into the freezer for about 15-20 minutes, it hardens it just enough to make cutting the rolls very easy. this method also works with pastry dough rolls.

  22. HeatherSolos on September 10, 2009 at 12:35 pm

    You want to cross the thread and pull it tight, right? I think I'm picturing the right move. I'll have to try it with the savory version I'm making today.

    • Eugene Mah on September 10, 2009 at 6:28 pm

      yes, bring the ends up, cross them over the log like you're about to tie a knot (but don't) and pull.

  23. Eugene Mah on September 10, 2009 at 12:29 pm

    some unwaxed floss or thread also makes a good cutting implement for sectioning off the log. Slide the thread underneath, and pull the ends across in one swift motion to get a reasonably clean cut without too much smushing

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