Pork Spare Ribs, Memphis Dry Rub Style

Heather says:

I found this a few months ago via Andre Pope, South Carolina’s youngest Certified Senior BBQ Judge, naturally. It’s quite silly, but gives a good overview of the many kinds of BBQ out there. I will admit to never having been brave enough to try it Alabama style and yes, when I’m through, you can bury me in BBQ.

This BBQ Rub may look a little familiar, I use it on chicken, boston butt, as well as the occasional slab of ribs. The oven temperature looks low, but this helps the ribs become very tender. When some proteins are cooked quickly, they become tough. Don’t try to rush this recipe, it can be cooked longer if you’d like.

BBQ Rub

  • 1/4 cup paprika
  • 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons minced, dried onion
  • 2 teaspoons peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 2 tablespoons ground cumin
  • 3 tablespoons ground coriander
  • 1/4 cup kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup light brown sugar

Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor and give it a whir until well blended.

Slather it all over your ribs. The rack pictured are pork spare ribs, which are cut further down on the pig than baby back ribs and have more meat. Rub it in on both sides.  You can do this up to a day ahead. Just make sure it is covered and refrigerated if not cooked immediately.

Preheat the oven to 225F. Cook uncovered for 2 hours, wrap in foil, and cook for an additional hour or until tender. I turn the slab of ribs once every hour, but I’m not sure it’s necessary.

You can baste it with your favorite mop sauce if you, but my family prefers to eat it as is.

Cut the slab of ribs into individual ribs, serve, and enjoy.

(I didn’t get a good enough picture of the cut ribs, sorry.)

Remember BBQ is just a term for meat prepared in a very special way.

Linked to Make It From Scratch.

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Comments

    • says

      I know! Watching it makes me hungry. I haven't met a bbq I don't like. Sure there are some styles I prefer, but when someone mentions bbq I'm there. For a while there was a local group that was visiting all the local bbq joints as a meet up type thing. It was a lot of fun and a great way to try new things.

  1. Stacy says

    Okay, I wasn't going to be bothered to watch the video, but then I did. I laughed, and I even learned some things–white barbecue sauce?. We yankees do often use "barbecue" as a verb, not as a special way of cooking meat. I've had to change my vocabulary in recent years to try to get it right. Cute. Thanks for sharing this recipe too; it looks good. One thing I have a hard time enjoying is traditional barbecue sauce…except on ribs.

    This is off the topic, but I just started using the feature in your print program that lets me cut out bits of text–that's really helpful! I enjoy reading your posts, but when I print it out, I really like to keep it to one page.

    • says

      I don't know about your region, but in our stores even the selection of pre-made has been growing like crazy over the past few years. There used to just be KFC Masterpiece and a few others, now it's large portion of the condiment aisle.
      Andre is my go-to for bbq. I have a couple of boston butts I'm going to smoke in a couple of weeks. I think I'm going to do a series on foods for tailgating parties. Life has a way of interrupting my plans though, so time will tell.

  2. says

    That video was funny! I'm from Minnesota, furthest possible from the south!! I think it's funny how Florida isn't considered a southern state? What is it considered? In MN, we use BBQ as a verb, I can see where it is a completely different concept! Too funny!

    Love the spice rub! I"m going to have to try that, thanks!

  3. Damian says

    Wow, what a great-sounding rub! Here in Memphis, we can get Corky's regular rub at the grocery store, but now I'm inspired to try my own. In the oven, then 20 mins on the grill to get the smokey flavor. Mmmmm, good!

  4. says

    I think I know what I will be making this weekend. This kind of rub is also good sprinkled on veggies coated with olive oil. I then grill the veggies

  5. Joseph says

    Hey, I'm from Alabama, and I have NEVER seen a mayo based BBQ sauce! Smokey/vinegar is the norm. Loved the video, and Florida is not a cultural Southern state, by and large. Waves of immigrants and snow-birds have made it California (notice the map in the video).

    • says

      I'm with you on Florida when you are talking coastal or cities, but the rural areas get a pass. In my late teens I dated a guy from outside of Jacksonville whose family raised beef cattle. Visiting his family was just like being home in the Lowcountry or GA.

      I have seen mayo based bbq sauce, there is a fabulous BBQ joint here in Charleston called Home Team BBQ and they had had / have? it. I didn't try it, as I tend to view mayo with a suspicious eye.