Hoagie Roll Tutorial

Heather says:

After getting the hang of basic white bread, these rolls should be a cinch. There are no fancy ingredients, but you will need a rolling pin.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cup warm water + extra for sprinkling
  • 2 1/2 tsp yeast
  • 2 1/2 TBSP olive oil
  • 3 1/2 cups flour (for best results use bread flour)
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt
  • 3 1/2 tsp sugar

Directions are after the jump.

Combine the yeast, warm water, and olive oil.

Whisk together dry ingredients in a large bowl.

Stir in the wet ingredients just until the dough comes together.

Knead on a lightly floured surface until smooth.

Divide the dough into 7 balls of equal size, allow to rest for 10 – 20 minutes. Lightly grease a cookie sheet.

Roll each dough ball into a rectangle about 4″ x 8″. It doesn’t have to be perfect.

Roll the dough lengthwise and lightly sprinkle the seam with water to seal.

Tuck each end under, and use a little water to seal. Place each roll, seam side down, about two inches apart on a greased baking sheet. Allow to rise in a warm, humid place.  I turn on my oven for five minutes at 200F and place a shallow pan of water on the bottom rack.

Let rise for 45 minutes to an hour.

Use a very sharp knife to cut two diagnol slashes in each roll. Do not touch the rolls with your fingers or you may leave funny dents.

Mist with water for a nice crust, but it isn’t crucial (I skipped that step). Bake for 15 – 20 minutes at 450F.

Cool for at least ten minutes on a wire rack.

Enjoy.



9 Comments

  1. TMFL on March 29, 2012 at 3:53 pm

    Hi I was just wondering how to make hoagie rolls from french bread dough because I’ve tried to do them the way I was instructed by my deli manager and they still seem to come out smaller than his,he told me to stretch the dough as if I was gonna make french bread and then cut the dough in 3 equal sections and then cut the sections in half and lay on baking pan on top of pan liner baking paper after dipping in cornmeal and place in proofer to rise and then after they come out of the proofer make one single score mark down the center of the dough and spray w/quick shine and bake. Is there another way of doing this to make the hoagies bigger?

  2. Jack on January 8, 2011 at 2:11 am

    Hello Heather… I have never baked bread before and these sound great and very easy. I've been looking for a recipe to make rye hoagie rolls and was wondering if you think I could substitute a cup of rye flour for a cup of the bread flour and add some caraway seeds to the dough? Thanks for the recipe.

  3. Chandrika on August 11, 2010 at 4:15 pm

    I tried this hoagie recipe and it came out really good. I want to thank you for posting this recipe. Next time I want to make the hoagies with sesame & poppy seeds. Can you please tell me when to put the sesame or poppy seed topping. I tried just before baking and the seeds did not stick to the dough.

    • Doug on November 9, 2010 at 2:05 pm

      Put seeds on at the time of baking. Just lightly egg wash the rolls with a brush and put on seeds. The seeds will stick and the egg wash will give a nice shine to the rolls.

  4. lori champion on March 18, 2009 at 8:34 am

    I use a very similar recipe…….but I use 2 eggs and a tad bit more flour. If you don’t use eggs the bread turns out like a biscuit.

    • Heather on June 28, 2009 at 4:34 pm

      That may be true for some breads, but this isn’t a quick bread and there is a definite yeast flavor.

    • Jeff on December 14, 2009 at 5:03 am

      I'm looking for a bread with a very very light fluffy interitor. This looks heavey but the crust looks nice. Explain more detail the texture and weight of interior dough.

  5. Kat on September 25, 2008 at 1:19 pm

    I’ve never quite been able to get bread down, which is one of the many reasons I come here…now, where’s my rolling pin?

  6. Barb Szyszkiewicz on September 24, 2008 at 9:15 pm

    Thanks for this! I have bread down pat but I’m not so good with hoagie-type rolls. I will save a lot of money if I can master them, since the kids like them for lunches. I appreciate the step-by-step.

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