Popovers in a Muffin Tin

retrochick.JPGMichele says:

Have you ever had a popover?  If you haven’t, you’re missing out on one of my all-time favorite sides for a Sunday roast.  Crispy and crunchy outside with an airy inside, popovers are the perfect utensil for transporting gravy from plate to mouth.  Like Yorkshire puddings without the pan drippings, popovers are simple to make with five ingredients you probably already have in the house—or seven if you’re a fan of pepper and Parmesan cheese.  And no, you don’t need some fancy schmancy popover pan.  The most difficult part of this recipe is keeping yourself from peeking on them during the baking process!  (Seriously, don’t open the oven until 30 minutes into baking.  Deliciously good things come to those who wait.)

Looking back, I think I may have just undersold the deliciousness that is a popover.  Don’t get me wrong, most would agree that popovers are absolutely lovely eaten plain or as a Sunday roast side dish, but few people are unaware that popovers lead a double life as the English version of a taco shell.  Once cooked, popovers can be halved and filled with just about anything from cheese to eggs to fruit to salad. In fact, if you’d put it on bread, in a tortilla, or atop puff pastry, chances are that it’ll be equally good inside a popover.  The worst thing about popovers?  Filled or not, you can’t have just one!

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Popovers in a Muffin Tin

Note: Let the cold ingredients sit at room temperature for 30 minutes before making the batter; cold batter makes for doughy popovers!  Use a gentle hand when whisking the batter because over mixed popovers are more commonly known as “yucky”.

  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon melted butter, plus more for greasing the pan
  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 eggs
  • freshly ground black pepper (optional)
  • ¼ cup shredded Parmesan cheese (optional)

Step One: Preheat the oven to 450 F.

While the oven is preheating, make your batter.  In a medium sized bowl, whisk together 1 cup milk, 1 tablespoon melted butter, 1 cup flour, and ½ teaspoon kosher salt.  Remember not to overmix!

Crack two eggs into the batter and whisk again, mixing only until the batter is just combined.  The finished batter will look like crepe batter or heavy cream and may have a couple of lumps.  Let sit until the oven has reached 450 F.
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Step Two: Liberally grease a heavy standard muffin tin with the additional melted butter.  Fill each muffin cup with a scant 3 tablespoons of batter.  The amount in each cup is not important, so long as they are evenly filled.
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Top each uncooked popover with a grind of black pepper and/or a sprinkle of shredded Parmesan cheese. (Both optional but highly recommended.)
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Step Three: Place the popovers in the preheated oven, close the door and keep it closed.  After 15 minutes, lower the heat to 350 F.  Bake an additional 15-20 minutes or until the popovers are browned.

Step Four: After you remove the popovers from the oven, use a paring knife to poke a hole in the top of each one to allow the steam to escape. (Very few things in life are worse than soggy popovers.)
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Step Five: Once you’ve created a vent for the steam, immediately transfer the popovers to a cooling rack.  If the popovers seem stuck to the pan, use the back of a paring- or butter knife to release the sides.
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If you cut the popovers in half and find that they look like the picture below, use your fingers or a paring knife to remove the excess dough.
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Ideally, however, they should look something like this:
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Serve immediately, or halve and fill with something tasty (may I recommend arugula and chicken salad?  Mmmmmm…).
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Makes 12 popovers.

P.S. If you have leftovers, store them in a zip top bag.  They will get soggy overnight, but they can be easily re-crisped.  Set the soggy popovers on an ungreased baking sheet, then place the baking sheet in your cold oven.  Set the oven to preheat to 350 F.  Once the oven has preheated, remove the popovers from the oven and transfer them to a cooling rack.  Serve immediately.

Michele Newell is a housewife turned blogger turned Home Ec 101 contributor.  You can read her near daily ramblings at Dreams Unreal.

Submitted to: Mouthwatering Monday

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Comments

  1. umm who has leftover popovers?

    You do need a popover pan becasue you popovers end up way bigger that way!

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