Pan Seared Ribeye

Heather says:

Sometimes the tastebuds say, “Grill up a steak!” but the weatherman says, “Snow, rain, blizzard, hurricanes, cats, dogs, plagues of frogs!” What to do, what to do?

Why pan sear, of course. Now, it isn’t quite the same as grilling a marinated steak, but it has some of the same qualities. I enjoy this method sliced thinly with either creamy horseradish or teriyaki on the side. Pan searing requires a heavy pan, such as cast iron or stainless steel that can take very high heat. Please check your manufacturer’s recommendation if it is made of any material other than cast iron or steel. Some handles are only oven safe up to 375F. Never use a Teflon pan.

It also requires a little common sense and requires that you pay attention and don’t get distracted fussing at your children and grab the handle of said pan. Not that I would ever do anything birdbrained like that, says the the slowly typing author. Have hotpads at the ready and clear the kitchen BEFORE you actually sear the steaks, it’s a short process. The steaks should be done cooking in under ten minutes once the pan is hot and ready to go, so start your side dishes well before the main course. It’s already taken me longer to write up the recipe than it did to cook.

 

pan-seared-ribeyeIngredients:

  • 2 1.5″ inch thick ribeye steaks
  • scant amount of canola oil
  • pinch of kosher salt

Directions:

ribeye-steakBefore cooking, allow the steaks to come to room temperature. Brush both sides of each steak with canola oil and sprinkle with kosher salt.

Preheat the oven to 500°F. Place your dry pan in the oven and allow to heat.

ribeys-in-panWhen the pan is hot, turn your burner on high. Use a hotpad to transfer the pan to the burner. Place  the steaks in the pan for thirty seconds. Use tongs and turn the steaks, allow to cook for another thirty seconds. Transfer to the 500°F oven and cook for 3 minutes, turn and allow to cook for another 3 minutes. 

This method cooks 1.5″ steaks to a nice medium, if you prefer medium-rare steaks cook for two minutes per side and for medium well, 4 minutes on the first side and 3 on the second.

Slice thinly and serve.

Suggested sides: rice, roasted vegetables, stir fried vegetables, baked potatoes, mashed potatoes, baked sweet potatoes

Enjoy!

*Edit 8/10/2011* It has been brought to my attention that Alton Brown’s method is the same, Pioneer Woman also uses a very similar method and so does Erin Cooks. This post was posted in 2008 and I really cannot remember the exact technique source. So a hat tip to all of them 🙂



4 Comments

  1. John I. Carney on February 12, 2010 at 10:10 pm

    You might want to elaborate on why not to use Teflon, for those who haven't heard. It's not just a culinary matter — nonstick coatings can release a gas at very high temperatures that can cause flu-like symptoms. You should never preheat a dry, empty nonstick skillet at high temperatures.

    http://www2.dupont.com/Teflon/en_US/products/safe

  2. Lisa F on January 19, 2009 at 2:28 pm

    I have my butcher cut the ribeye into thirds, then fry with some Vanzants seasoning and onions….onto a bun or grilled rye with some cheese or A1 and a yummy ribeye sandwich. DH loves these and it’s quick and easy for a weeknight….pluse two can eat off of one steak, he eats 2, I eat 1.

  3. Tracy on December 16, 2008 at 1:26 pm

    I have a special cast iron grill pan that gives me that nice grooved markings on my steak. Its not a substitute for the wonderful flavor I LOVE from charcoal but it works in the winter. You are so right about the pan needing to be screaming hot. They just dont sear right if they arent. Thanks for the awsome tip!

  4. Judith on December 13, 2008 at 12:38 am

    Heather, that sounds wonderful! My mouth is watering just reading the recipe. Next time our local butcher (yes, we have one!) puts these steaks on sale, I’m there!

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